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civil rights movement word list

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  1. W. E. B. Du Bois

    United States civil rights leader and political activist who campaigned for equality for Black Americans (1868-1963)
    Clockwise from top left:
    W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr..

    The African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968) refers to the movements in the United States aimed at outlawing racial discrimination against African Americans and restoring Suffrage in Southern states.

  2. Rosa Parks

    United States civil rights leader who refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery (Alabama) and so triggered the national Civil Rights movement (born in 1913)
    Clockwise from top left: W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X,
    Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr..

    The African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968) refers to the movements in the United States aimed at outlawing racial discrimination against African Americans and restoring Suffrage in Southern states.

  3. nonviolent

    achieved without bloodshed
    During the period 1955–1968, acts of
    nonviolent protest and civil disobedience produced crisis situations between activists and government authorities.
  4. CORE

    an organization founded by James Leonard Farmer in 1942 to work for racial equality
    Many of those who were active in the Civil Rights Movement, with organizations such as NAACP, SNCC,
    CORE and SCLC, prefer the term "Southern Freedom Movement" because the struggle was about far more than just civil rights under law; it was also about fundamental issues of freedom, respect, dignity, and economic and social equality.
  5. sit-in

    a form of civil disobedience in which demonstrators occupy seats and refuse to move
    Forms of protest and/or civil disobedience included boycotts such as the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955–1956) in Alabama; "sit-ins" such as the influential Greensboro
    sit-in (1960) in North Carolina; marches, such as the Selma to Montgomery marches (1965) in Alabama; and a wide range of other nonviolent activities.
  6. Malcolm X

    militant civil rights leader (1925-1965)
    Clockwise from top left: W. E. B. Du Bois,
    Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr..

    The African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968) refers to the movements in the United States aimed at outlawing racial discrimination against African Americans and restoring Suffrage in Southern states.

  7. African-American

    an American whose ancestors were born in Africa
    (April 2010)

    Prominent figures of the
    African-American Civil Rights Movement.
  8. racial discrimination

    discriminatory or abusive behavior towards members of another race
    Clockwise from top left: W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr..

    The African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968) refers to the movements in the United States aimed at outlawing
    racial discrimination against African Americans and restoring Suffrage in Southern states.

  9. Greensboro

    a city of north central North Carolina
    Forms of protest and/or civil disobedience included boycotts such as the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955–1956) in Alabama; "sit-ins" such as the influential
    Greensboro sit-in (1960) in North Carolina; marches, such as the Selma to Montgomery marches (1965) in Alabama; and a wide range of other nonviolent activities.
  10. boycott

    refusal to have commercial dealings with some organization
    Forms of protest and/or civil disobedience included
    boycotts such as the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955–1956) in Alabama; "sit-ins" such as the influential Greensboro sit-in (1960) in North Carolina; marches, such as the Selma to Montgomery marches (1965) in Alabama; and a wide range of other nonviolent activities.
  11. Selma

    a town in central Alabama on the Alabama river
    Forms of protest and/or civil disobedience included boycotts such as the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955–1956) in Alabama; "sit-ins" such as the influential Greensboro sit-in (1960) in North Carolina; marches, such as the
    Selma to Montgomery marches (1965) in Alabama; and a wide range of other nonviolent activities.
  12. Rosa

    large genus of erect or climbing prickly shrubs including roses
    Clockwise from top left: W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X,
    Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr..

    The African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968) refers to the movements in the United States aimed at outlawing racial discrimination against African Americans and restoring Suffrage in Southern states.

Created on June 9, 2010

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